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Your Questions Answered

Almah_Shoot 2Parents deciding on a summer enrichment activity for their teen girls naturally have many questions. Below, I have listed answers to the most common questions I’ve received about Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: What will my daughter learn?

A: She will engage in creative writing, storyboarding, video production, setting up scenes, set design, directing, filming, videography, editing, special effects, and animation.

Q: What is the student-teacher ratio?

A: We accept a maximum of 24 students, or 8 students per teacher.

Q: Your camp seems expensive. Why is it priced at $589?

A: Our camp is two weeks in length. Camp days are six hours long. That’s sixty hours of high-quality instruction in a supportive, small-class setting at less than ten dollars per hour. Considering what our students learn, it’s a bargain!

Q: Is this a new camp? Have you run this camp in the past?

A: Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest is new to Eugene. I co-ran two similar camps in the California Bay Area, in 2015 and 2016. For more information on those camps, please visit Media Poetry Studio’s website.

Q: During the summer, I’d like my daughter to spend some time outdoors. Your camp seems mostly indoors.

A: We will spend approximately ¼ of our time outdoors. We have photography and filming field trips planned for Skinner Butte Lookout and Skinner Butte Park.

Q: What will my daughter have to show for her time at your camp?

A: Your daughter will have several short videos she made herself. She will have had the experience of working in a small, supportive group, of increased self-esteem, and the feeling of empowerment that comes from learning and working in a team-oriented environment.

Enrollment is open.

Warmly,

Erica

 

Erica Goss

Founder and Director

Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest

V is for Values

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Every teen girl needs encouragement to take on new challenges, handle stress, set goals, and develop a healthy sense of self.

At Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest, we celebrate and respect teen girls. We understand their need for acceptance and their growing independence. Our core values reflect our beliefs in the potential of every girl:

  • Teamwork. Each girl is a valued part of a creative team.
  • Trust. Our students learn to trust themselves and their intuitions.
  • Courage. We create a safe space for our students to explore what interests them.
  • Creativity. We believe that every girl has talent.
  • It’s ok to make mistakes. Mistakes are how we learn, grow, and discover new things.

Our list of core values reflects our motto, which is “A supportive community for girls.” We truly believe that the creative potential of teen girls is a major force for good in the world.

Enrollment is open.

Warmly,

Erica

 

Erica Goss

Founder and Director

Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest

15 Female-directed Films

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Here’s a list of fifteen feature films directed by women, debuting in 2018. Some are already out, and some are still coming:

  1. The Strange Ones
  2. The Party
  3. A Wrinkle in Time
  4. What They Had
  5. Blockers
  6. The Rider
  7. Zama
  8. I Feel Pretty
  9. The Spy Who Dumped Me
  10. Barbie
  11. The Nightingale
  12. The Darkest Minds
  13. Can You Ever Forgive Me?
  14. Mulan (live action version)
  15. Mary, Queen of Scots

I’m going to see them all!

If You Give a Girl a Camera

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I’ve always loved the book If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, which I read to my children when they were little. In the book, a boy gives a delicious chocolate chip cookie to a mouse. The mouse loves the cookie, which leads him to ask for things to go with it: a glass of milk, a straw to drink the milk with, a mirror to see if he has a milk moustache, etc. Soon the mouse is asking for a story, a nap, and eventually, another cookie.

When I discovered video poetry in 2012, I was just like the mouse: my curiosity led me in a number of directions. First I watched hundreds of videos. Soon I reached out to video artists, interviewing them for my column The Third Form. A year or so later, I began to experiment with making my own video poems, and soon after, ran Media Poetry Studio, a summer camp dedicated to teaching the art to teen girls. Now that I live in Eugene, Oregon, I’ve created Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest, a summer program dedicated to teaching teen girls how to make their own short videos.

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My “cookie” was a chance encounter at a writers’ conference in the winter of 2012. I wandered into a conference titled “Poetry Video in the Shadow of Music Video – Performance, Document, and Film.” When I entered Boulevard Room A at the Chicago Hilton and took a seat at the back of the room, I had no idea that my life would change. Now video-making is an important and growing part of my artistic practice.

 

If you give a girl a camera, what will she do next? Imagine the possibilities!

 

Enrollment is open.

Warmly,

Erica

 

Erica Goss

Founder and Director

Digital Storytelling of the Pacific Northwest